Cambs Uni Publications

Category Archives: Swastika

The Swastika in Norway

28th November 2015
Posted by S Taylor

The Norwegian for Swastika is Hakekors.  When investigating the prehistoric culture of Scandinavia we find many similarities between the ethnographic symbolism of Norway and the neighbouring countries of Sweden, Denmark, Finland and Iceland.  In many places we find strong links between runes and Swastikas. This article seeks to portray the distinctive decorative contribution made by […]

The Swastika in Poland

27th November 2015
Posted by S Taylor

In parts of Eastern Europe the Swastika motif can be traced back to pre-Christian Slavic mythology. It was probably dedicated to the sun god Svarog and known as Swarzyca.   For the Slavs the Swastika was a magic sign manifesting the power and majesty of the sun and fire. It was often used as an ornament decorating […]

The Swastika in Latvia

25th November 2015
Posted by S Taylor

A great variety of ethnographic symbols have been in use in Latvia over many centuries.   Swastika-type symbolism can also be traced back to very early times.  It has been labelled  ‘Thunder Cross’ ,’Fire Cross’ and ‘Branched Cross’, and it has been associated with ‘happiness’, ‘energy’, ‘fire’ and ‘wind’. It is still used in personal clothing, […]

The Swastika in Denmark

24th November 2015
Posted by S Taylor

The Danish for Swastika is Hagekors. It has occurred in many forms and at many times and places in Denmark, often in association with runes.  A fine example of this is found on the Værlose fibula, or brooch from Sjælland, now housed in the National  Museum of Denmark.  One Danish scholar reckons this brooch comes […]

The Swastika in Finland

17th November 2015
Posted by S Taylor

The Finnish for Swastika is Hakaristi.  This symbol was often found on wooden objects, textiles and fabrics amongst the Finno-Ugric peoples, and regularly appears in the folk culture of Finland. In the Middle Ages the symbol was used in church fittings, furniture and wall-paintings.  The Hakaristi appears as a Greek-style fret around the door of […]

The Swastika in Sweden

16th November 2015
Posted by S Taylor

The Swedish for Swastika is Hakkors. In common with the neighbouring countries of Norway, Finland and Iceland this symbol has appeared in many contexts and guises over the centuries.  There are links with mythology, manufacturing and the military forces of Sweden and Finland. Some of the earliest examples are to be found in Bracteates, many […]

Icelandic Symbolism – Part Three

14th November 2015
Posted by S Taylor

  The Icelandic for Swastika is Hakakross.  This symbol has appeared in a great variety of contexts over the centuries; it appeared on cremation urns, as a charm for fishermen in all weathers and as a commercial logo for a shipping company. The Icelandic Steamship Company [Eimskipafjelag Islands in Icelandic] was presented with the emblem […]

Icelandic Symbolism – Part Two

14th November 2015
Posted by S Taylor

The Icelandic for Swastika is Hakakross.  This symbol has appeared in a great variety of contexts over the centuries; it appeared on cremation urns, as a charm for fishermen in all weathers and as a commercial logo for a shipping company. Lucky charms It seems very likely that the Thorshammar was regarded by many Icelanders […]

Icelandic Symbolism – Part One

14th November 2015
Posted by S Taylor

The Icelandic for Swastika is Hakakross.  This symbol has appeared in a great variety of contexts over the centuries; it appeared on cremation urns, as a charm for fishermen in all weathers and as a commercial logo for a shipping company. The rectilinear Hakakross had been in regular use from prehistoric times. It is found […]

Brussels Swastika-ban debate

14th November 2015
Posted by S Taylor

The European Union held a debate in the spring of 2005 on a proposal to ban Nazi symbols across its 25 member states. The ban was proposed shortly after an heir to the British throne, Prince Harry, was photographed wearing a WWII German uniform with a Swastika armband. He subsequently apologised for causing offence by […]

US Army 45th Infantry Division

2nd October 2015
Posted by S Taylor

The tradition of adopting the Swastika symbol for military usage had been well established during the first World War.  The Escadrille Lafayette, named after the gallant hero of the French and Amemrican Revolutions, the Marquis de Lafayette, had been composed of volunteer American fighter pilots.  Some of their planes had a black Swastika emblazoned on […]

The Escadrille Lafayette in World War 1

1st October 2015
Posted by S Taylor

During World War 1 the Escadrille Lafayette was composed largely of American volunteer pilots flying fighter aircraft.  It was named in honour of the Marquis de Lafayette, hero of both the American and French revolutions.  Born in 1757 the Marquis de Lafayette launched into his military career at the tender age of 14 by which time he […]

The Swastika Symbol in Canada

9th September 2015
Posted by S Taylor

It’s rather unusual for a town to be called ‘Swastika’.  This particular township was founded in the early years of the 20th Century around a mining site in northern Ontario. The town was formed in 1908 by miners who came to develop the “Lucky Cross” (Swastika) gold mine. During World War 2 people naturally  got […]

North American Swastika Usage

2nd September 2015
Posted by S Taylor

In North America there had been a widespread use of the Swastika as a benign goodwill symbol up until the 1930s.  Even after the rise of Nazism in those years, with its disturbing and diabolical misappropriation of what had been a goodwill symbol worldwide in innumerable cultures, usage continued by its own momentum until the […]

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